Be BRAVE, stand up! Be a BRAVE Ambassador!

Brave Ambassadors
Meet Beth and Liv, 4th graders at Laura Ingalls Wilder Elementary in Sioux Falls, SD.  They are BRAVE Ambassadors at their school!

What is a BRAVE Ambassador?

An Ambassador is a member of the BRAVE Ambassador anti-bullying club at their school:

  • An ambassador is there to help victims of bullying.  Someone that is willing to listen to others concerns about bullying.  Someone that will provide support and help for victims of bullying.
  • An ambassador is passionate about stopping bullying and works to stop it by holding awareness days at school and events at school by promoting kindness and providing resources for students being bullied.
  • An ambassador cares about others and keeps an eye out for bullying, they will not stand by when bullying is witnessed.
  • An ambassador will Be Strong Online and report cyberbullying.
  • An ambassador actively works to show people that a bullying is uncool and promotes Building Respect and Values in Everyone.
  • An ambassador is BRAVE enough to tackle issues in a productive manner and is willing to speak up about bullying issues.
  • An ambassador is a role model for others.

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If one stands up, others will follow

Be BRAVE, stand up!

Become a BRAVE Ambassador at your school!

Got a bullying problem? Get advice!

Bullying help
Made great friends at Miss Amazing fashion show!

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If you need someone to talk to, I am a good listener and passionate about helping people that are being bullied.  I too have been bullied many times verbally and from cyberbullying too.  I know it is hard, I was at the lowest point in my life after being bullied.  But with the help of God and family and friends, I was able to build my confidence back up.  Now I want to help you get through it too! Please don’t hesitate to email me or contact me through this website!  I want to help you!

Brooke Peck, Miss Nebraska High School 2016

Bullying hurts and being a victim of any kind of bullying feels really bad. And it’s important for you to know two things:

You’re NOT alone
It’s NOT your fault

So now that you know that, here’s how you can STOMP Out Bullying™:

What To Do If You Are Being Bullied

If you’re being bullied there’s a lot you can do. While different tactics work for different people, the first thing you should do is try to work it out yourself.

Depending on how bad the bullying is (and as long as you don’t feel at risk, scared or physically threatened) you might want to try and work it out yourself – as a first step.

The more empowered you are, and the more you can help yourself, the better chance you have to stop the bully.

If the bully doesn’t change their behavior, that’s when talking to someone else can be really helpful.

The bully wants you to react. Their goal is to take away your power, make you sad and scared. And if you show them you are not sad and scared, they will often lose interest and they cannot take away your power.

Remember they want to upset you constantly so you get angry. If you don’t get angry, the bully will lose their own power.

Remember that bullies are human – they eat, sleep and live just like you do. The only difference is that you are NOT a bully! Bullies act the way they do because they lack the attention or parental love and nurturing that you have. They are insecure and bully only to feel powerful.

Bullies look for a reaction from you and often lose interest if they aren’t given the satisfaction of getting one.

If You Feel Safe, Here Are Some Ways To Handle The Bully:

  • Walk away when the bully approaches you. Try and imagine you’re walking away from a stranger. Both you and your body language will show you don’t care.
  •  Concentrate on thinking about something else (maybe a concert you want to go to, or a new outfit you want to buy.)
  • When the bully approaches you, count to 100 and keep walking. They’ll never see how upset you are.
  • Yelling STOP and walk away. Keep walking and don’t turn around no matter what they say.
  • When a bully calls you a name or tells you your sneakers are ugly — look at them in the eyes and laugh hysterically and say, “I know my sneakers are ugly.” Keep laughing hysterically and walk away without any additional conversation
  • When the bully harasses you and calls you names, look them in the eyes, LAUGH and walk away without any additional conversation.

Some great comeback lines are:

  • Whatever!
  • Do you feel better now?
  • If you’re talking about me behind my back, clearly my life is a lot more interesting than yours is!
  • Let’s move on!
  • You finally found something funny to say?
  • I’m not sure why you keep saying these things about me, but I don’t care.
  • Be really cool and stop this!
  • Enough!
  • Why are you talking to me?
  • Here we go again. This is boring. Let me know when you’re done.
  • I’ve been called worse from better.
  • Wow, did you come up with that all by yourself?
  • Pardon me, but you seem to think that I care.

Once you give your comeback line — IT’S SO IMPORTANT to just walk away and keep walking! Do not react or respond. That’s what the bully wants!

When you walk away you’re taking away the bully’s power!

Be Positive

It can be hard to remember all your good points when someone is doing their best to be negative. However, try to think of all the things you do well and remember that you are a valuable person. Thinking of how bad the bully must be feeling may also help you to stay positive.

Picture This

Picture your bully standing on their head with their body stretching – almost as if they were standing in front of a distorted mirror like the kind you see at a carnival. Listen to their voice as comes out all distorted and warbled. And they’ve turned yellow with pink stripes. Now who’s laughing?

Build A Wall Around You

Can you visualize a tall stone wall? Build that invisible wall around you and when it’s up, imagine all the things the bully is saying bouncing off that wall.

Be confident

Bullies usually pick on people that they think are weaker than they are, so stand up to them. You might be scared but if you keep standing up to them they’ll stop.

Other ways to conquer your bully and throw them off track:

  • By loudly saying “leave me alone”
  • Say something funny
  • Look them in the eye and be nice to them

Keep out of their way

If you are afraid of your bully avoid places where your bully hangs out, or take a different route to school. If the bully doesn’t see you, they can’t bully you.

The Buddy System

Bullies feel empowered to bully one person, but rarely will they bully a group. Hang out with your friends. If the bully does feel like conquering the group, walk away.

If after using these tactics and the bullying doesn’t stop, it may be time to ask for help. Don’t be afraid to let someone know that you are being bullied. There are people who care about you and will help you.

Get Help – Tell An Adult

It may seem scary to tell someone but, telling will not only get you help, it will make you feel less afraid. If you are being physically bullied and are in danger you must speak with a trusted adult immediately. And if you can’t go to your parents, seek out a trusted teacher guidance counselor or school psychologist.

If you’ve told a grown-up before and they haven’t done anything about it, tell someone else. Tell them exactly what happened, who did the bullying, where and when it happened, how long it’s been happening to you, and how it’s making you feel.When you tell your teacher, guidance counselor or school psychologist, ask them what they will do to help stop the bullying. It is their job to help keep you safe. Most adults really care about bullying and will do everything they can to help you. Keep telling until someone does help you!

If you are being bullied online …

NEVER RESPOND

This could actually make the bullying worse. Immediately tell your parents or a trusted family member. Have your parents block all communications from this person. Be sure to save evidence of the cyberbullying. If you get a nasty e-mail, print it out or save it so that you can show it to an adult.

While you should never respond to cyberbullying, (this includes cyberbullying you by text, email or instant messaging – save the texts, emails or instant messages for proof in case you need it) — it’s great if you can be brave and courageous and show the bully you just don’t care.

What NOT To Do If You Are Bullied

DO NOT…

  • Think it’s your fault. Nobody deserves to be bullied!
  • Fight back or bully a person back
  • Keep it to yourself and just hope the bullying will “go away.” Make sure you report the bullying.
  • Skip school or avoid school or afterschool activities because you’re afraid of the bully
  • Don’t be afraid to tell. Telling is NOT tattling! It’s the right thing to do!
  • Hurt yourself. Nothing is that hopeless that it can’t be resolved. As painful as bullying is, NOTHING is ever that bad that you should hurt yourself in any way.

Your Rights

NO MATTER, you deserve to feel safe. Everyone has the right to live in a safe and violence free atmosphere both at home and at school.

Become a BRAVE Ambassador at your school!

Brave Ambassadors
Become a BRAVE Ambassador at your school and get this awesome t-shirt!
Become a BRAVE Ambassador at your school and get this awesome t-shirt!

Become a BRAVE Ambassador at your school and get this awesome t-shirt!

What is a BRAVE Ambassador?

  • An ambassador is there to help victims of bullying.  Someone that is willing to listen to others concerns about bullying.  Someone that will provide support and help for victims of bullying.
  • An ambassador is passionate about stopping bullying and works to stop it by holding awareness days at school and events at school by promoting kindness and providing resources for students being bullied.
  • An ambassador cares about others and keeps an eye out for bullying, they will not stand by when bullying is witnessed.
  • An ambassador will Be Strong Online and report cyberbullying.
  • An ambassador actively works to show people that a bullying is uncool and promotes Building Respect and Values in Everyone.
  • An ambassador is BRAVE enough to tackle issues in a productive manner and is willing to speak up about bullying issues.
  • An ambassador is a role model for others.

Cyberbullying tips!

Bullying help
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What is Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying is bullying that takes place using electronic technology. Electronic technology includes devices and equipment such as cell phones, computers, and tablets as well as communication tools including social media sites, text messages, chat, and websites.

Examples of cyberbullying include mean text messages or emails, rumors sent by email or posted on social networking sites, and embarrassing pictures, videos, websites, or fake profiles.

Why Cyberbullying is Different

Kids who are being cyberbullied are often bullied in person as well. Additionally, kids who are cyberbullied have a harder time getting away from the behavior.

  • Cyberbullying can happen 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and reach a kid even when he or she is alone. It can happen any time of the day or night.
  • Cyberbullying messages and images can be posted anonymously and distributed quickly to a very wide audience. It can be difficult and sometimes impossible to trace the source.
  • Deleting inappropriate or harassing messages, texts, and pictures is extremely difficult after they have been posted or sent

Effects of Cyberbullying

Cell phones and computers themselves are not to blame for cyberbullying. Social media sites can be used for positive activities, like connecting kids with friends and family, helping students with school, and for entertainment. But these tools can also be used to hurt other people. Whether done in person or through technology, the effects of bullying are similar.

Kids who are cyberbullied are more likely to:

  • Use alcohol and drugs
  • Skip school
  • Experience in-person bullying
  • Be unwilling to attend school
  • Receive poor grades
  • Have lower self-esteem
  • Have more health problems
  • Prevent Cyberbullying

    A mother and son look at a computer

    • Know the sites your kids visit and their online activities. Ask where they’re going, what they’re doing, and who they’re doing it with.
    • Tell your kids that as a responsible parent you may review their online communications if you think there is reason for concern. Installing parental control filtering software or monitoring programs are one option for monitoring your child’s online behavior, but do not rely solely on these tools.
    • Have a sense of what they do online and in texts. Learn about the sites they like. Try out the devices they use.
    • Ask for their passwords, but tell them you’ll only use them in case of emergency.
    • Ask to “friend” or “follow” your kids on social media sites or ask another trusted adult to do so.
    • Encourage your kids to tell you immediately if they, or someone they know, is being cyberbullied. Explain that you will not take away their computers or cell phones if they confide in you about a problem they are having.Parents and kids can prevent cyberbullying. Together, they can explore safe ways to use technology.

      Be Aware of What Your Kids are Doing Online

      Talk with your kids about cyberbullying and other online issues regularly.

    Establish Rules about Technology Use

    Establish rules about appropriate use of computers, cell phones, and other technology. For example, be clear about what sites they can visit and what they are permitted to do when they’re online. Show them how to be safe online.

    Help them be smart about what they post or say. Tell them not to share anything that could hurt or embarrass themselves or others. Once something is posted, it is out of their control whether someone else will forward it.

    Encourage kids to think about who they want to see the information and pictures they post online. Should complete strangers see it? Real friends only? Friends of friends? Think about how people who aren’t friends could use it.

    Tell kids to keep their passwords safe and not share them with friends. Sharing passwords can compromise their control over their online identities and activities.

    Understand School Rules

    Some schools have developed policies on uses of technology that may affect the child’s online behavior in and out of the classroom. Ask the school if they have developed a policy.

    • Review their terms and conditions or rights and responsibilities sections. These describe content that is or is not appropriate.
    • Visit social media safety centers to learn how to block users and change settings to control who can contact you.
      • Don’t respond to and don’t forward cyberbullying messages.
      • Keep evidence of cyberbullying. Record the dates, times, and descriptions of instances when cyberbullying has occurred. Save and print screenshots, emails, and text messages. Use this evidence to report cyberbullying to web and cell phone service providers.
      • Block the person who is cyberbullying.Report cyberbullying to the social media site so they can take action against users abusing the terms of service.

        Report Cyberbullying

        A young boy sits at a computer

      • When cyberbullying happens, it is important to document and report the behavior so it can be addressed.

      Steps to Take Immediately

      • Don’t respond to and don’t forward cyberbullying messages.
      • Keep evidence of cyberbullying. Record the dates, times, and descriptions of instances when cyberbullying has occurred. Save and print screenshots, emails, and text messages. Use this evidence to report cyberbullying to web and cell phone service providers.
      • Block the person who is cyberbullying.

      Report Cyberbullying to Online Service Providers

      Cyberbullying often violates the terms of service established by social media sites and internet service providers.

    Report Cyberbullying to Law Enforcement

    When cyberbullying involves these activities it is considered a crime and should be reported to law enforcement:

    • Threats of violence
    • Child pornography or sending sexually explicit messages or photos
    • Taking a photo or video of someone in a place where he or she would expect privacy
    • Stalking and hate crimes

    Some states consider other forms of cyberbullying criminal. Consult your state’s laws and law enforcement for additional guidance.

    Report Cyberbullying to Schools

    • Cyberbullying can create a disruptive environment at school and is often related to in-person bullying. The school can use the information to help inform prevention and response strategies.
    • In many states, schools are required to address cyberbullying in their anti-bullying policy. Some state laws also cover off-campus behavior that creates a hostile school environment.

Help for parents and guardians!

Bullying help
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Signs a Child is Being Bullied

Look for changes in the child. However, be aware that not all children who are bullied exhibit warning signs.

Some signs that may point to a bullying problem are:

  • Unexplainable injuries
  • Lost or destroyed clothing, books, electronics, or jewelry
  • Frequent headaches or stomach aches, feeling sick or faking illness
  • Changes in eating habits, like suddenly skipping meals or binge eating. Kids may come home from school hungry because they did not eat lunch.
  • Difficulty sleeping or frequent nightmares
  • Declining grades, loss of interest in schoolwork, or not wanting to go to school
  • Sudden loss of friends or avoidance of social situations
  • Feelings of helplessness or decreased self esteem
  • Self-destructive behaviors such as running away from home, harming themselves, or talking about suicide

Signs a Child is Bullying Others

Kids may be bullying others if they:

  • Get into physical or verbal fights
  • Have friends who bully others
  • Are increasingly aggressive
  • Get sent to the principal’s office or to detention frequently
  • Have unexplained extra money or new belongings
  • Blame others for their problems
  • Don’t accept responsibility for their actions
  • Are competitive and worry about their reputation or popularity

Why don’t kids ask for help?

Statistics from the 2012 Indicators of School Crime and Safety show that an adult was notified in less than half (40%) of bullying incidents. Kids don’t tell adults for many reasons:

  • Bullying can make a child feel helpless. Kids may want to handle it on their own to feel in control again. They may fear being seen as weak or a tattletale.
  • Kids may fear backlash from the kid who bullied them.
  • Bullying can be a humiliating experience. Kids may not want adults to know what is being said about them, whether true or false. They may also fear that adults will judge them or punish them for being weak.
  • Kids who are bullied may already feel socially isolated. They may feel like no one cares or could understand.
  • Kids may fear being rejected by their peers. Friends can help protect kids from bullying, and kids can fear losing this support.
  • Support the Kids Involved

    All kids involved in bullying—whether they are bullied, bully others, or see bullying—can be affected. It is important to support all kids involved to make sure the bullying doesn’t continue and effects can be minimized.

    Support Kids Who are Bullied

    Listen and focus on the child. Learn what’s been going on and show you want to help.

    Assure the child that bullying is not their fault. 

    Know that kids who are bullied may struggle with talking about it. Consider referring them to a school counselor, psychologist, or other mental health service.

    Give advice about what to do. This may involve role-playing and thinking through how the child might react if the bullying occurs again.

    Work together to resolve the situation and protect the bullied child. The child, parents, and school or organization may all have valuable input. It may help to:

    • Ask the child being bullied what can be done to make him or her feel safe. Remember that changes to routine should be minimized. He or she is not at fault and should not be singled out. For example, consider rearranging classroom or bus seating plans for everyone. If bigger moves are necessary, such as switching classrooms or bus routes, the child who is bullied should not be forced to change.
    • Develop a game plan. Maintain open communication between schools, organizations, and parents. Discuss the steps that are taken and the limitations around what can be done based on policies and laws. Remember, the law does not allow school personnel to discuss discipline, consequences, or services given to other children.

    Be persistent. Bullying may not end overnight. Commit to making it stop and consistently support the bullied child.

    Avoid these mistakes:

    • Never tell the child to ignore the bullying.
    • Do not blame the child for being bullied. Even if he or she provoked the bullying, no one deserves to be bullied.
    • Do not tell the child to physically fight back against the kid who is bullying. It could get the child hurt, suspended, or expelled.
    • Parents should resist the urge to contact the other parents involved. It may make matters worse. School or other officials can act as mediators between parents.

    Follow-up. Show a commitment to making bullying stop. Because bullying is behavior that repeats or has the potential to be repeated, it takes consistent effort to ensure that it stops.

    Address Bullying Behavior

    Parents, school staff, and organizations all have a role to play.

    Make sure the child knows what the problem behavior is. Young people who bully must learn their behavior is wrong and harms others.

    Show kids that bullying is taken seriously. Calmly tell the child that bullying will not be tolerated. Model respectful behavior when addressing the problem.

    Work with the child to understand some of the reasons he or she bullied. For example:

    • Sometimes children bully to fit in. These kids can benefit from participating in positive activities. Involvement in sports and clubs can enable them to take leadership roles and make friends without feeling the need to bully.
    • Other times kids act out because something else—issues at home, abuse, stress—is going on in their lives. They also may have been bullied. These kids may be in need of additional support, such as mental health services.

    Use consequences to teach. Consequences that involve learning or building empathy can help prevent future bullying. School staff should remember to follow the guidelines in their student code of conduct and other policies in developing consequences and assigning discipline. For example, the child who bullied can:

    • Lead a class discussion about how to be a good friend.
    • Write a story about the effects of bullying or benefits of teamwork.
    • Role-play a scenario or make a presentation about the importance of respecting others, the negative effects of gossip, or how to cooperate.
    • Do a project about civil rights and bullying.
    • Read a book about bullying.
    • Make posters for the school about cyberbullying and being smart online.

    Involve the kid who bullied in making amends or repairing the situation. The goal is to help them see how their actions affect others. For example, the child can:

    • Write a letter apologizing to the student who was bullied.
    • Do a good deed for the person who was bullied or for others in your community.
    • Clean up, repair, or pay for any property they damaged.

    Avoid strategies that don’t work or have negative consequences.

    • Zero tolerance or “three strikes, you’re out” strategies don’t work. Suspending or expelling students who bully does not reduce bullying behavior. Students and teachers may be less likely to report and address bullying if suspension or expulsion is the consequence.
    • Conflict resolution and peer mediation don’t work for bullying. Bullying is not a conflict between people of equal power who share equal blame. Facing those who have bullied may further upset kids who have been bullied.
    • Group treatment for students who bully doesn’t work. Group members tend to reinforce bullying behavior in each other.

    Follow-up. After the bullying issue is resolved, continue finding ways to help the child who bullied to understand how what they do affects other people. For example, praise acts of kindness or talk about what it means to be a good friend.

Meet the BRAVE Ambassadors!

Brave Ambassadors
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Meet BRAVE Ambassadors from Lincoln East High School, Emily Johnson, Alexis Mayse and Morgan Cole! They are eager to stop bullying at their school!

Meet BRAVE Ambassadors from Lincoln East High School, Emily Johnson, Alexis Mayse and Morgan Cole! They are eager to stop bullying at their school!

Meet Beth and Liv, 4th graders at Laura Ingalls Wilder Elementary in Sioux Falls, SD.  They are BRAVE Ambassadors at their school!

Meet Beth and Liv, 4th graders at Laura Ingalls Wilder Elementary in Sioux Falls, SD. They are BRAVE Ambassadors at their school!

Meet these two awesome guys who are BRAVE Ambassadors at their schools. Cole is a 5th grader at Kloephkorn Elementary and Grant is a student at Lincoln East High School!

Meet these two awesome guys who are BRAVE Ambassadors at their schools. Cole is a 5th grader at Kloephkorn Elementary and Grant is a student at Lincoln East High School!

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Appearances

Brave, Community Service
My old middle school, Lux Middle School, speaking to 6th graders.
First official appearance, three days after becoming Miss Nebraska High Shool 2016

First official appearance, three days after becoming Miss Nebraska High School America 2016

I met with CHI Health St. Elizabeth Violence Prevention Coordinator, Augusta Kamara today.  She just received a grant to reduce bullying in schools and she wants to us the BRAVE Ambassador Program as part of her anti-bullying program.  We will be starting this school year in seven middle schools in Lincoln, and expanding more each year!  This is truly going to make a difference!

I met with CHI Health St. Elizabeth Violence Prevention Coordinator, Augusta Kamara today. She just received a grant to reduce bullying in schools and she wants to us the BRAVE Ambassador Program as part of her anti-bullying program. We will be starting this school year in seven middle schools in Lincoln, and expanding more each year! This is truly going to make a difference!

I love working with my sister queens, Miss Nebraska Collegiate Hanna Ehmke and Miss Nebraska Jr. High Kailynn Thelan to spread the word about BRAVE!

I love working with my sister queens, Miss Nebraska Collegiate Hanna Ehmke and Miss Nebraska Jr. High Kailynn Thelan to spread the word about BRAVE!

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Met with youth groups at United Methodist Church in Dakota City, NE. Absolutely loved these kids!

I loved getting to know these girl scouts, I can't wait to see what they do to stop bullying in their community.

I loved getting to know these girl scouts, I can’t wait to see what they do to stop bullying in their community.

We all earned a no bullying badge today!

We all earned a no bullying badge today!

Working with City Impact to organize Lincoln Stands Together Event, an day to bring the city of Lincoln together against bullying.

Working with City Impact to organize Lincoln Stands Together Event, a special day to bring the city of Lincoln together against bullying.

Fund raising for Miss Amazing with Miss Nebraska Jr. High Kailynn Thelan

Fund raising for Miss Amazing with Miss Nebraska Jr. High Kailynn Thelan

So privileged to serve our military at the Big Red Challenge!

So privileged to serve our military at the Big Red Challenge!

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We had the honor of serving our military veterans on armed forces day at the Big Red Challenge!

We had the honor of serving our military veterans on armed forces day at the Big Red Challenge!

Having so much fun at Miss Nebraska 2016, this is Miss Nebraska Collegiate, Hanna Ehmke and Miss America Outstanding Teen, Allie Nault

Having so much fun at Miss Nebraska 2016, this is Miss Nebraska Collegiate, Hanna Ehmke and Miss America Outstanding Teen, Allie Nault

So great to meet all the men and women that serve the public at Helicopter Day. It is my dream to become a flight nurse or paramedic!

So great to meet all the men and women that serve the public at Helicopter Day. It is my dream to become a flight nurse or paramedic!

Troop 56115 earned their "no bullying" badge and their "social butterfly" badge today! I loved speaking to them about BRAVE, what a great group of girls!

Troop 56115 earned their “no bullying” badge and their “social butterfly” badge today! I loved speaking to them about BRAVE, what a great group of girls!

Speaking to 4th graders at Laura Ingalls Wilder Elementary in Sioux Falls SD about BRAVE!

Speaking to 4th graders at Laura Ingalls Wilder Elementary in Sioux Falls SD about BRAVE!

We had the opportunity to prepare and serve dinner to families at Childrens Hospital Rainbow House!

We had the opportunity to prepare and serve dinner to families at Childrens Hospital Rainbow House!

American Heart Association Heartwalk was so much fun! It was a great way to raise awareness about heart disease and stroke.

American Heart Association Heartwalk was so much fun! It was a great way to raise awareness about heart disease and stroke.

So fun to meet new BRAVE Ambassadors at Lux Middle School!

So fun to meet new BRAVE Ambassadors at Lux Middle School!

Met LPS school board member at the backpack walk!

Met LPS school board member at the backpack walk!

Performing the chicken dance at backpack program fundraising walk!

Performing the chicken dance at backpack program fundraising walk!

Spoke with second graders at Kloefkorn Elementary, great goup of BRAVE Ambassadors!

Spoke with second graders at Kloefkorn Elementary, great goup of BRAVE Ambassadors!

Met with Senator Bolz to discuss BRAVE Ambassador program!

Met with Senator Bolz to discuss BRAVE Ambassador program!

Miss Nebraska Jr. High and Miss Nebraska High School visited the State Capital again today to meet with State Senators and school administrators to discuss bullying problems.

Miss Nebraska Jr. High and Miss Nebraska High School visited the State Capital again today to meet with State Senators and school administrators to discuss bullying problems.

Who wants to become a BRAVE Ambassador? Lincoln Stands Together at City Impact.

Who wants to become a BRAVE Ambassador? Lincoln Stands Together at City Impact.

Presenting BRAVE Ambassador program!

Presenting BRAVE Ambassador program!

Lincoln Stands Together event, uniting citizens of Lincoln to stand against bullying!

Lincoln Stands Together event, uniting citizens of Lincoln to stand against bullying!

Presented my BRAVE Ambassdor program at Lincoln Stands Together bullying awareness event!

Presented my BRAVE Ambassdor program at Lincoln Stands Together bullying awareness event!

Speaking to 6th graders at Lux Middle School, what a great group of BRAVE Ambassadors!!

Speaking to 6th graders at Lux Middle School, what a great group of BRAVE Ambassadors!!

My old middle school, Lux Middle School, speaking to 6th graders.

My old middle school, Lux Middle School, speaking to 6th graders.

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Miss Nebraska Jr High, Miss Nebraska Collegiate and myself spoke to second grade students at Maxey Elementary about BRAVE. Channel 8 local news interviewed us!

Miss Nebraska Jr High, Miss Nebraska Collegiate and myself spoke to second grade students at Maxey Elementary about BRAVE. Channel 8 local news interviewed us!

Made great friends at Miss Amazing fashion show!

Made great friends at Miss Amazing fashion show!

Miss Amazing fashion show was Amazing!

Miss Amazing fashion show was Amazing!

Miss Iowa Collegiate, Miss Nebraska Collegiate, Miss Nebraska High School, Miss Nebraska Jr. High, Miss Iowa Jr. High at NAM Nebraska

Miss Iowa Collegiate, Miss Nebraska Collegiate, Miss Nebraska High School, Miss Nebraska Jr. High, Miss Iowa Jr. High at NAM Nebraska

My good friend, Liv, did a great job modeling at OFW.

My good friend, Liv, did a great job modeling at OFW.

Omaha Fashion Week with great friends.

Omaha Fashion Week with great friends.

Met with Senator Baker to discuss bullying concerns in schools.

Met with Senator Baker to discuss bullying concerns in schools.

 

Kailynn, Miss Jr. High Nebraska and I met with counselors at Scott Middle School to discuss BRAVE Ambassador program.

Kailynn, Miss Jr. High Nebraska and I met with counselors at Scott Middle School to discuss BRAVE Ambassador program.

Upcoming Events

Community Service
Nationals
Big Red Challenge Lincoln, NE. I will be handing out medals at the finish line. May 21 9am!

Big Red Challenge Lincoln, NE. I will be handing out medals at the finish line. May 21 9am!

Miss High School America 2016 will be crowned on July 16, 2016 in San Antonio! I can't wait to meet all these ladies and make new friendships! I would love to bring the crown home to Nebraska! I would love to take the BRAVE Ambassador program nationally!

Miss High School America 2016 will be crowned on July 16, 2016 in San Antonio! I can’t wait to meet all these ladies and make new friendships! I would love to bring the crown home to Nebraska! I would love to take the BRAVE Ambassador program nationally!

I am so excited for Crown Academy this year! I am so honored that my two cousins will be there to support me, represent Nebraska and have fun!! Olivia Wells and Aspen Obermeyer are ready for San Antonio!

I am so excited for Crown Academy this year! I am so honored that my two cousins will be there to support me, represent Nebraska and have fun!! Olivia Wells and Aspen Obermeyer are ready for San Antonio!

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